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The Politics of I Town


I Town is one third of the tripartite corporate society of Trintico. Trintico has risen from the debris of social collapse after petroleum depletion and climate catastrophe. Trintico may or may not be a dystopian society, depending upon the definition of dystopian.

The standard definition of dystopia is a place where things are really bad. Things are not really bad in Trintico, especially compared to the rest of the world where famine is prevalent and feudalism flourishes. At least on the surface, things appear to be pretty good.

Ah ha! There's the catch.

A dystopian society can also exist where a government controls its population through deceptive means to an undesirable end. So then maybe Trintico is a dystopia. But what about the part the members of society play in their own deception and ruin?

Society is a phenomenon that has momentum. Its very existence is defined as its momentum. The desire to survive draws people into villages. Their desire to thrive encourages them to contruct walled cities. And so on.

Strange things can happen in these phenomena called societies. For example, in a society with a two party political system, an amoral manipulator can rise to be its leader. The opposing party can overcome by reaching out to the religious segment of society, only to have the scoundrel's party retaliate and set itself up as the party of morals and values.

Sound familar? It should.

“Governing,” proclaims the Secreatry of Electricity, “is best done with more carrot than stick.”


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