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The I Town Diet


We cannot and do not create energy. We can only transfer energy from one state to another. The old Carbon Nation burned coal in its power plants, transferring the potential energy from the coal into water which became steam which drove turbines which turned generators which made the electric power they used to toast bread with clean and convenient resistance heating coils. The same toasters are still in use in Trintico, but the electricity that makes their coils glow comes from the efforts of people walking inside treadwheels. These people don’t make the electricity but transfer it, with their bodys’ metabolisms, from the energy in the food they eat.

The average walkers on I Town’s treadwheels can produce about one kilowatt-hour every three hours they walk and must eat about a thousand Calories for that output. The average walk-day in I Town is ten hours, so the average walker needs 3,300 Calories per day. That’s the average. The little 200–pounder back on the last row of a 40 row wheel can get by with half that—for output. But to maintain his weight he needs to eat at least 2200 Calories. So that’s almost 4000 Calories per day for the smallest walkers. The big Ironclads up at the front weighing in at 500 pounds need over 9000 Calories per day. That's a lot of beef.


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Go to:

Body-Mass Index
Body Mass Index Calculator at WebMD


fat, protein and carb calories
Compare calories in fat, protein and carbs at NutriStrategy.com


real nutrition is more than just calories
Calcualte nutrient intake, not just calories, at FreeDiet.com


real nutrition is more than just calories
The glycemic index of carb sources shows how fast the carbs are digested. Health.Harvard.edu has a nice GI table.


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